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Project planning

The balance between insight and workability. Everyone plans projects in their own way. The question is, should you plan your project in one big block or opt for well-organized, detailed smaller components? Each method of breaking down a project has its advantages and disadvantages. How do you know which method best suits your organization? That's the question we're going to answer in this blog post. First, we'll take a look at an example scenario. Then we'll look at the reasons why you

When to use a Gantt Chart for a project and when not to? The Gantt Chart, a type of bar chart, is a specific method to make the project comprehensible in a graphic way. The question, however, is: when does it make sense to use a Gantt Chart and when doesn't it? When speaking to organizations, I have noticed that they are not always sure about this and therefore waste time or lack certain insights. In this blog, we will provide

Achieve as many results as possible, in as few hours as possible. The 80/20 rule, also known as the "Pareto principle", asserts that 80% of all outcomes are a result of 20% of the effort. Everyone knows about the example where 80% of all sales are a result of 20% of the customer base. Thus, by giving more attention to a small group of customers this leads to disproportionate revenue. In this blog post we'll look at how to use the

Avoid expanding time. I mean Parkinson's law, not the terrible brain disease. Parkinson's law states that work is spread over the time that is available to complete the work. This is one of the 4 time wasters in project planning which we discussed in one of our previous blog postings. In this blog we will see how you can determine if your project planning has this condition and how to manage it. First some background. Parkinson's law was formulated by C. Northcote

According to the Critical Chain Project Management method, 50% of the built-in safety margin in projects could go. It is a waste of time and by cutting back, projects could be completed in 3/4 of the normal time. That is a time saving of 25%. To achieve this, Critical Chain Project Management uses the Buffer Management technique.   We estimate way too much I've discussed the causes of this waste of time in the blog 4 time wasters in project planning. It concerns

The Standish Group conducts research on project performance every year. It turns out that the majority is not delivered within the scheduled time. The main cause is that much time is wasted by the way in which projects are planned. Employees include a generous margin of safety in the project plan to ensure that they will complete the activity in time. However, research shows that they waste their safety margin. There are 4 causes.   1. The student syndrome If people think they